Working with Primary Sources

How can working with primary sources help your students in their research? What is different about working with these sources? How do they find primary sources (whether physical or digital) on a topic of interest? What should they expect when visiting a special collections library? This video is intended for students having any level of experience with primary sources.

Primary Sources workshop on Vimeo

Race at Haverford: Policy, Relationships, and Representation

Introduction

This primary source packet contains materials pertaining to race and ethnicity at Haverford College between the 1940s and the 1990s. It is by no means an exhaustive list of materials, but these sources do shed light on histories of discrimination, solidarity, racial identity, diversity initiatives, and student activism at Haverford. Because administrative records constitute the bulk of the College Archives’ holdings, the majority of these materials were produced by offices and individual administrators on campus. However, there are also materials created by students and alumni that offer an alternative perspective on many topics.

These materials may support classes and research topics related to race and identity studies, the history of higher education, the history of student activism, and the history of Haverford College.

Packet contents:

Primary Sources

Howard Comfort letter to Morris Leeds regarding the admission of Black students to Haverford, November 23, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley and Brint Stone correspondence on the performance of the Main Line Community League Inter-Racial Chorus at Haverford, June 14, 1944. HCB-001-006 Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 3, “Scattergood Files–May 1943-December 1944”
[digitized version]

Jan Long letter to Felix Morley regarding admission of Black students to Haverford, December 21, 1944. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1943-1945”
[digitized version]

Charles Silberman letter to John Coleman on Black students and housing, December 4, 1969. HCB-001-012 John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

Greg Kannerstein’s reaction to Charles Silberman’s letter, January 5, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

Greg Kannerstein letter to Leonard Krivy on Black Studies at Haverford, January 14, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

Sid Perloe and John Coleman correspondence on Black students and housing, January 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

Greg Kannerstein letter to Sid Perloe on Black students and housing, February 25, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

Black Students League statement on the Vietnam War, ca. 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

Richard Luman to Gerhard Spiegler regarding Black students and library collections, May 10, 1971. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

Black Students League letter to the Board of Managers, May 21, 1971. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-May 1971”
[digitized version]

John Nelson, Class of 1973, letter to the staff of the Bryn Mawr-Haverford College News regarding the Committee on Student Standings, September 13, 1971. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, August-December 1971”
[digitized version]

John Coleman memo to Black students at Haverford, September 15, 1971. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, August-December 1971”
[digitized version]

John Coleman memo to John Nelson, Kendall Martin, and Theodore Williams, November 8, 1971. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, August-December 1971”
[digitized version]

Black Students League, “Several Concerns, or, A Bill of Facts,” February 9, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, February 1972”
[digitized version]

Black Students League, “Our Specific Concerns,” February 20, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, February 1972”
[digitized version]

Thomas D’Andrea memo to faculty on BSL statements, February 21, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, February 1972”
[digitized version]

Puerto Rican Students at Haverford, “Some of Our Concerns,” February 22, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, February 1972”
[digitized version]

John Coleman, “Perspectives on the Black Students’ Statement,” February 23, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, February 1972”
[digitized version]

“A Summary and Chronology of Events Leading to and Related to the Boycott by the Black Students’ League and Puerto Rican Students of Haverford,” March 10, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, March 1972-1973”
[digitized version]

Greg Kannerstein memo on summer program, March 21, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, March 1972-1973”
[digitized version]

John Coleman memo on new athletics facility, March 30, 1972. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, March 1972-1973”
[digitized version]

The Sisterhood and the Black Students League, “The Status of Afro-American History in the Bi-College Community,” March 27, 1973. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students League, March 1972-1973”
[digitized version]

PRSH, AASH, BSL memo to John Coleman, February 19, 1975. HCS-003-079, Rick DeJesús-Rueff, Documents pertaining to the history of Puerto Rican students at Haverford College, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Puerto Rican Students at Haverford memo to Stephen Cary, March 31, 1975. HCS-003-079, Rick DeJesús-Rueff, Documents pertaining to the history of Puerto Rican students at Haverford College, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Student Affairs Committee memo, May 6, 1975. HCS-003-079, Rick DeJesús-Rueff, Documents pertaining to the history of Puerto Rican students at Haverford College, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Juan Albino and Rick DeJesús, History of Puerto Rican Students at Haverford, ca. 1975. HCS-003-079, Rick DeJesús-Rueff, Documents pertaining to the history of Puerto Rican students at Haverford College, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Minorities Coalition Memo, April 13, 1977. HCS-003-079, Rick DeJesús-Rueff, Documents pertaining to the history of Puerto Rican students at Haverford College, Box 1.
[digitized version]

William M. Harris, Report on Diversity at Haverford College, 1980. HCB-001-014, Harry C. Payne presidential papers, Box 4, “Minority Affairs, 1987-1988”
[digitized version]

Report of the Joint Bryn Mawr College-Haverford College Diversity Review Committee, 1983. HCB-001-015 Thomas G. Kessinger presidential papers, Box 2, “Committee on Diversity, 1983”
[digitized version]

Report of the Committee on Diversity: Minority Concerns, 1984-1985. HCB-001-014, Harry C. Payne presidential papers, Box 2, “Committee on Diversity, September-October 1987”
[digitized version]

Harry C. Payne memo to Committee on Diversity, October 9, 1987. HCB-001-014, Harry C. Payne presidential papers, Box 2, “Committee on Diversity, September-October 1987”
[digitized version]

Marilou Allen’s response to Payne’s memo, October 28, 1987. HCB-001-014, Harry C. Payne presidential papers, Box 2, “Committee on Diversity, November 1987-May 1988”
[digitized version]

Matthew Hamabata, Report from the Office of Minority Affairs, January 1988. HCB-001-015 Thomas G. Kessinger presidential papers, Box 4, “Minority Affairs 1988-1989, Background Material, 1978-1988”
[digitized version]

Correspondence between Harry C. Payne and Vernon Dixon on affirmative action in hiring, May 18, 1988. HCB-001-015 Thomas G. Kessinger presidential papers, Box 1, “Affirmative Action, 1988-1989”
[digitized version]

Matthew Hamabata letter on race relations programming at Haverford, June 2, 1989. HCB-001-015 Thomas G. Kessinger presidential papers, Box 4, “Minority Affairs, 1988-1989”
[digitized version]

Calendar of Events for Black History Month at Haverford College, sponsored by the Black Students League, February, 1990. HCQ-003-043, Black Students League records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

BGALA agenda for a workshop on race and sexuality, February 13, 1995. HCQ-003-013, Sexuality and Gender Alliance records, Box 1, “Miscellaneous Materials, 1994-1996”
[digitized version]

Budgeting form for the Women of Color Group, ca. 1994-1995. Women of Color Group records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Guiding Questions

  • Who created these sources?  For what purpose?
  • Describe the implied audience for these materials. What informs your opinion?
  • How do discussions of race relations on campus by students differ from discussions by College administrators? How do different groups “measure” the campus climate as it relates to race and ethnicity?
  • How does the language regarding issues of race and identity change over time?
  • What tactics did student groups employ to express their needs and demands? How did administrators respond to these tactics?
  • How are the issues and concerns expressed in these materials still relevant today?
  • Whose voices are heard in these sources? Whose are not?

Haverford College During World War II

Introduction

This primary source packet contains materials related to Haverford College’s responses to World War II, and the experiences of a transformed campus community during wartime. Haverford College’s administration, led by President Felix Morley, pursued many strategies to keep the College afloat during the war, none of which pleased all faculty, staff, students, members of the Board of Managers, and alumni. Major topics emerging from these sources include the tensions between the College’s professed Quaker principles and the political, social, and economic pressures to support the national war effort; changes to the curriculum and campus community brought on by the war; and collaborations between Haverford College and the U.S. government, and between Haverford and other national and international organizations.

These materials may support classes and research topics related to the history of World War II, peace and conflict studies, Quaker studies, military history, the history of higher education, and the history of Haverford College.

Packet contents:

Primary Sources

Nearly all of the textual sources can be found in HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers. The finding aid for this collection is available here

Haverford’s Early Adaptations to Wartime and Discussions of Quaker Principles

Felix Morley memo to the Board of Managers and faculty regarding an accelerated college program, January 15, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 3, “Scattergood Files–War Activities–January to October 1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley letter to Fred J. Kelly, Chief of the Division of Higher Education within the U.S. Department of Education, July 26, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 3, “Scattergood Files–War Activities–January to October 1942”
[digitized version]

American Council on Education, “Proposed Plan for Enlisted Training Corps,” October 14, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Edward W. Evans letter to Felix Morley objecting to military recruitment on campus, October 17, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley letter to Senator Gerald Nye on the war’s effect on colleges and the proposed draft of 18- and 19-year-olds, October 24, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 3, “Scattergood Files–War Activities–January to October 1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley letter to Senator Robert Reynolds concerning the draft, October 26, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley memo to Board of Managers on cooperation with the federal government, November 15, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 3, “Scattergood Files–War Activities–November to December 1942”
[digitized version]

Richard M. Sutton letter to Felix Morley regarding pre-meteorological program, November 20, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Howard Comfort letter to Morris Leeds on Quaker principles and the pre-meteorological program, November 23, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Frederic Sharpless letter to Felix Morley on Haverford’s response during World War I, November 23, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Thomas Drake letter to Felix Morley on Quaker principles and the pre-meteorological program, November 25, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley letter to Morris Leeds on Relief and Reconstruction, the Board of Managers’ reaction to his plans, and the “Quakerness” of the College, November 25, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Douglas Steere letter to Morris Leeds from the Civilian Public Service Camp, November 25, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Faculty vote on allowing a military training unit on campus, November 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Letter from Wilson H. Pile, Class of 1941, to Felix Morley, December 2, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Confidential memo by Felix Morley outlining Haverford’s role in the national war effort, December 8, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley and Bernard Waring correspondence on Quaker principles and the “Quakerness” of the College, December 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1943-1945”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley and Joshua L. Baily, Jr., correspondence on Whittier College and the possibility of Haverford’s closure, February 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1943-1945”
[digitized version]

Morley report to the War Manpower Commission entitled “The More Effective Utilization of Small College Facilities in the National Interest,” February 11, 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 3, “Scattergood Files–War Activities–January to March 1943”
[digitized version]

Alumni Association, “Haverford in Wartime,” 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1943-1945”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley, “Can the Small College Survive?” The Saturday Evening Post, October 16, 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 3, “Scattergood Files–War Activities–May 1943 to December 1944.”
[digitized version]

The Army Specialized Training Program (A.S.T.P.) at Haverford College

Felix Morley letter to Colonel E.J. Oliver making formal application for the establishment of a Language and Area Study Unit and a Basic Pre-Professional Unit, July 17, 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Army Specialized Training Program, 1943”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley memo to faculty on the instruction of the A.S.T.P. unit, August 25, 1943.  HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Army Specialized Training Program, 1943”
[digitized version]

U.S. War Department memo to presidents of colleges and universities on reductions in the A.S.T.P., February 1944. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Army Specialized Training Program, 1944”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley memo to Board of Managers and faculty on the contraction of the A.S.T.P., March 10, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Army Specialized Training Program, 1944”
[digitized version]

Relief and Reconstruction

Excerpt from the American Friends Service Committee, “What Shall the Answer Be?”, 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley and Howard Elkinton correspondence on Relief and Reconstruction and Civilian Public Service Camps, December 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley and Joseph Willits correspondence on Relief and Reconstruction and conscientious objectors, December 1942. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “War Emergency, 1941-1942”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley letter to Douglas Steere regarding Haverford’s Citizenship and Reconstruction Unit, January 12, 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, January-June 1943”
[digitized version]

Reconstruction and Relief Unit announcement, early 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, January-June 1943”
[digitized version]

Second announcement of the Reconstruction and Relief Unit, early 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, January-June 1943”
[digitized version]

Application for the Reconstruction and Relief Unit of the Citizenship and Reconstruction Division, 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, January-June 1943”
[digitized version]

Felix Morley memo to the Board of Managers on the establishment of a Relief and Reconstruction unit to serve in China, May 12, 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, January-June 1943”
[digitized version]

Douglas Steere memo to the Women’s Unit of the Haverford College Relief and Reconstruction Training Divisions, May 27, 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, January-June 1943”
[digitized version]

Memo on the Reconstruction and Relief Training graduate course, ca. September 1943. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, July 1943-July 1944”
[digitized version]

Reconstruction and Relief training schedule, Fall 1944. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–Appointments, Courses, Budget and Expenses, Housing, etc.”
[digitized version]

Letter from Reconstruction and Relief staff to Felix Morley on the termination of the program with completion of current junior unit’s training in December 1945, November 17, 1944. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, September 1944-1945”
[digitized version]

Reconstruction and Relief training schedule, Spring 1945. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–Appointments, Courses, Budget and Expenses, Housing, etc.”
[digitized version]

Relief and Reconstruction curriculum for special area course on Germany, March 5, 1945. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, September 1944-1945”
[digitized version]

Harry W. Pfund, “Report on the Present Status of the Reconstruction & Relief Unit,” October 19, 1945. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, September 1944-1945”
[digitized version]

Relief and Reconstruction special area course on Austria, Czechoslovakia, Germany, and Poland in Washington, D.C., December 1945. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–General, September 1944-1945”
[digitized version]

“Positions Filled by Haverford College Reconstruction and Relief Unit (1943-1945) Members,” ca. 1947. HCB-001-006, Felix Morley presidential papers, Box 1, “Relief and Reconstruction–Appointments, Courses, Budget and Expenses, Housing, etc.”
[digitized version]

Excerpt from Lois V. Stanton, “Tales of a Haverford R and R Girl,” 1992. HCS-000-010, Lois V. Stanton, “Tales of a Haverford R and R Girl,” Box 1.
[digitized version]

Photographic Sources

Army Specialized Training Program students marching on campus with books, ca. 1944. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 34, “Campus Life III”
[digitized version]

Army Specialized Training Program students studying, ca. 1944. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 34, “Campus Life III”
[digitized version]

Wartime Haverford A.S.T.P. unit, ca. 1944. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 34, “Campus Life III”
[digitized version]

Relief and Reconstruction students learning auto mechanics, ca. 1945. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 34, “Campus Life III”
[digitized version]

Relief and Reconstruction auto mechanics, ca. 1945. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 34, “Campus Life III”
[digitized version]

Barclay interior, ca. 1944. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 34, “Campus Life III”
[digitized version]

Guiding Questions

  • Who created these sources?  For what purpose?
  • Describe the implied audience for these materials. What informs your opinion?
  • What was Haverford College’s initial response to the exigencies of the war effort? How did that response change over time? What were some suggested strategies for keeping the College open that were not adopted?
  • How did Haverford collaborate with the U.S. federal government during World War II? How did it collaborate with other national and international groups?
  • Many of these sources describe Haverford’s adherence (or lack of adherence) to Quaker principles during the war. Do these sources clearly define what those principles are? Does there seem to be a broad consensus regarding Quaker principles and their role in the College’s administration?
  • At this moment in its history, is Haverford a Quaker college? Why or why not?
  • How did the character of the campus community change during this period? Were any of these changes longlasting after the war?
  • Whose voices are heard in these sources? Whose are not?

Haverford College’s Response to World War I

Introduction

This primary source packet contains materials related to Haverford College’s response to the United States’ increased tensions with Germany and subsequent entry into World War I in 1917. As these sources demonstrate, the College implemented a number of strategies to support the war effort, including forming an emergency service unit, attempting to coordinate relief training with the Red Cross, and working in conjunction with the newly-formed American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) to provide relief in Europe. However, these sources also show that not everyone approved of the steps the College took to prepare students for a world at war.

These materials may support classes and research topics related to the history of World War I, peace and conflict studies, Quaker studies, military history, the history of higher education, and the history of Haverford College.

Packet contents:

Primary Sources

Excerpts from the Haverford College Emergency Unit scrapbook, 1917. HCS-000-005, Haverford College Emergency Unit scrapbook, 1917.
[digitized version]

Haverford Emergency Unit, ca. 1917. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph Collection, Box 32, “Campus Life I, undated”
[digitized version]

Record of the Class, 1917. HCL-003-002, Haverford College Yearbooks, Box 5.
[digitized version]

Record of the Class, 1918. HCL-003-002, Haverford College Yearbooks, Box 5.
[digitized version]

Record of the Class, 1919. HCL-003-002, Haverford College Yearbooks, Box 6.
[digitized version]

President William Wistar Comfort correspondence with the Red Cross War Council, 1918. HCB-001-005, William Wistar Comfort presidential papers, Box 1, “Letters A-C”
[digitized version]

Francis Cope Hartshorne letter to William Wistar Comfort on the teaching of German at Haverford, May 25, 1918. HCB-001-005, William Wistar Comfort presidential papers, Box 1, “Letters D-H”
[digitized version]

Francis Cope Hartshorne letter to William Wistar Comfort on lack of military preparation at Haverford, August 9, 1918. HCB-001-005, William Wistar Comfort presidential papers, Box 1, “Letters D-H”
[digitized version]

Guiding Questions

  • Who created these sources?  For what purpose?
  • Describe the implied audience for these materials. What informs your opinion?
  • What does visual and textual evidence tell us about the attitudes of Haverford faculty, students, and staff towards military service and noncombatant service to support the war effort? 
  • In what ways were Haverford’s curriculum and campus activities challenged during this period?
  • Do these sources tell us anything about broader American attitudes towards the war?
  • What do “relief and reconstruction” efforts entail?
  • How did the character of the campus community change during this period? Were any of these changes longlasting after the war?
  • Whose voices are heard in these sources? Whose are not?

Haverford College and the Vietnam War

Introduction

This primary source packet contains materials pertaining to Haverford College’s response to the Vietnam War from John R. Coleman’s presidential papers (HCB-001-012) and the Haverford College Photograph collection (HCT-001). Although most of these materials come from the archival records of Haverford’s Office of the President, they highlight the voices and experiences of students, faculty, and staff members.

These materials may support class and research topics related to student life and activism at Haverford, the history of the anti-war movement, the history of higher education, and the culture and politics surrounding the Vietnam War.

Packet contents:

Primary Sources

Haverford and Swarthmore students participate in an anti-war rally, 1965. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 39, “Campus Life VB”
[digitized version]

Haverford students at an anti-war protest, 1967. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 40, “Campus Life VIA”
[digitized version]

Haverford and Bryn Mawr students at an anti-war protest, 1967. HCT-001, Haverford College Photograph collection, Box 40, “Campus Life VIA”
[digitized version]

John Coleman statement on the draft to Haverford News, February 21, 1968. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Statements, 1967-1978”
[digitized version]

Community Concerns Committee memo on the Vietnam moratorium, September 23, 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Moratorium, 1969” 
[digitized version]

John Coleman’s statement and letter to Richard Nixon, October 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Statement, 1969–Presidents’ Letters”
[digitized version]

John Coleman memo on the Vietnam moratorium, October 7, 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Moratorium, 1969” 
[digitized version]

Marcel Gutwirth letter on the Vietnam moratorium, October 9, 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Moratorium, 1969” 
[digitized version]

John Coleman and Louis Green correspondence on the Vietnam moratorium, October 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Moratorium, 1969” 
[digitized version]

President of the Students’ Association Stan Murphy’s letter to John Coleman on the Vietnam moratorium, November 11, 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Moratorium, 1969” 
[digitized version]

Linda Gerstein memo, “What Shall We Do on Friday?” November 13, 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Moratorium, 1969” 
[digitized version]

Preston Rowe memo to faculty regarding voluntary relinquishing of pay, November 1969. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Vietnam Moratorium, 1969” 
[digitized version]

Statement of the Black Students League on the Vietnam War, ca. 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-1971”
[digitized version]

Memo to student body regarding “Classes to Congress,” ca. May 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 1, “Black Students, 1969-1971”
[digitized version]

Haverford College to Congress, May 5, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Washington Trip, May-August 1970”
[digitized version]

Harriet Beardsley letter to College staff regarding the Washington trip, May 5, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Washington Trip, May-August 1970”
[digitized version]

C.W. Smith memo to the campus regarding essential services during the Washington trip, May 5, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Washington Trip, May-August 1970”
[digitized version]

Fundraising for the Washington trip, May 6, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Washington Trip, May-August 1970
[digitized version]

Telegram from Senator Charles Goodell to John Coleman, May 6, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Washington Trip, May-August 1970”
[digitized version]

Washington trip seminar schedule, May 7, 1970. HCB-001-012, John R. Coleman presidential papers, Box 5, “Washington Trip, May-August 1970” 
[digitized version]

Guiding Questions

  • Who created these sources?  For what purpose?
  • Describe the implied audience for these materials. What informs your opinion?
  • What kind of tactics did members of the campus community employ to protest U.S. involvement in Vietnam?
  • Was there an institutional response from Haverford College to the Vietnam War? If so, what was it? If not, why do you think there was not?
  • What role do Quaker principles play in the student and administrative responses to the Vietnam War, if any?
  • Whose voices are heard in these sources? Whose are not?

LGBTQ+ History at Haverford College

Introduction

This primary source packet contains materials related to the experiences of LGBTQ+ students and LGBTQ+ activism at Haverford College from the 1970s to the 2000s. Although there were certainly LGBTQ+ individuals present on campus prior to the earliest materials in this packet, few archival records capture this aspect of their identities or broader discussions of gender and sexuality at Haverford. 

In 2016, Chris Bechen ’18 conducted oral histories with LGBTQ+-indentifying alumni from the Classes of 1965 through 2014 as part of a project entitled “That which is renamed, but always remains: an archival representation of LGBTQ+ life at Haverford College.” Recordings are available here and may be accessed by logging in with your Haverford credentials.

These materials may support classes and research topics related to the history of gender and sexuality, LGBTQ+ social movements, queer culture on college campuses, and student life and activism at Haverford.

Packet contents:

Primary Sources

Letter to Bryn Mawr and Haverford Departments of Psychology, December 15, 1976. HCQ-003-027, Gay People’s Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Gay People’s Alliance newsletter, ca. 1977. HCQ-003-027, Gay People’s Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Gay People’s Alliance newsletter, March 1979. HCQ-003-027, Gay People’s Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Gay People’s Alliance proposal for Customs, ca. 1984. HCQ-003-013, Sexuality and Gender Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Feminist Group writing exercise on lesbianism, ca. 1985. Feminist Group and Feminist Alliance records.
[digitized version]

BGALA, Prism, ca. 1988. HCQ-003-027, Gay People’s Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

BGALA, Prism, September 1991. HCQ-003-028, Bisexual, Gay, and Lesbian Alliance records, Box 1. 
[digitized version]

BGALA “Queers ‘n’ Customs packet,” 1993. HCQ-003-013, Sexuality and Gender Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

BGALA workshop on race and sexuality, February 13, 1995. HCQ-003-013, Sexuality and Gender Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Name change from “BGALA” to “SAGA,” 2001. HCQ-003-013, Sexuality and Gender Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Pride Week flyer, February 2010. HCQ-003-013, Sexuality and Gender Alliance records, Box 1.
[digitized version]

Guiding Questions

  • Who created these sources?  For what purpose?
  • Describe the implied audience for these materials. What informs your opinion?
  • What kinds of discussions were Haverford students having regarding sexuality and identity in the 1970s? How did these discussions change over time? 
  • Did the goals of Haverford’s LGBTQ+ groups change over time? If so, how?
  • How does the language used to describe the LGBTQ+ community and LGBTQ+ activism in these documents change over time? What might that tell you about how the LGBTQ+ social movements changed over time?
  • Whose voices are heard in these sources? Whose are not?

Mental Health

Introduction

This packet contains materials related to mental health from the 1800 to present, focusing on Friends Hospital and changes in mental health care of the early 1800s. These materials can support classes and research in public health, health studies, psychology, and history. Potential pedagogical goals from using these materials might include evaluating the changing role of mental health over time, examining whose voices are represented and whose are not, and exploring, analyzing, and putting materials in conversation.

The majority of the materials in this packet originate from Friends Hospital, which was founded in 1813 by a group of Quakers in Philadelphia who were concerned about the care of mentally ill Quakers. It was established on the Quaker idea that there is that of  God in everyone, and that mental illness does not change that. The touchstones of life at Friends Hospital were community and religious life, and these were to become part of its unique take on moral treatment.  The Hospital still exists today.

The materials listed here are only a small number of those related to Friends Hospital and mental health in the collections. More can be found at our research guide on the topic or by contacting Quaker & Special Collections.

Packet contents:

  • List of primary sources
  • Guiding questions for engaging with the primary sources
  • Materials which provide background on this topic
    • Cherry, Charles L. A Quiet Haven: Quakers, Moral Treatment, and Asylum Reform. Cranbury: Associated University Presses, 1989.
    • Godlee, Fiona. “Aspects of Non-Conformity: Quakers and the Lunatic Fringe.” In The Anatomy of Madness Volume II, edited by W.F. Bynum, Roy Porter, and Michael Shepherd, 73-82. London: Tavistock Publications, 1985.
    • Quakers and Mental Health portal

Primary Sources

Committee on an Asylum for the Insane Poor of Pennsylvania. An appeal to the people of Pennsylvania on the subject of an asylum for the insane poor of the Commonwealth. Philadelphia: Printed for the Committee, 1838.
[Digitized materials]

Elizabeth Shoemaker Taylor. Diary. Taylor Family papers. HC-MC-962
This collection contains the diary of Elizabeth R. Shoemaker Taylor who gives an account of Morgan Hinchman’s commitment to Friends’ Asylum in 1847, which resulted in a lawsuit against his family.
[Digitized materials]

Building Committee. Minutes. Friends Hospital records. HC-MC-1261 
The The Building Committee planned and supervised the construction of Friends Hospital. This volume of minutes holds information about the decisions the Committee came to concerning issues like paint color, windows, door locks, etc. They put a lot of thought into their architectural decisions because, according to the tenets of moral treatment, architecture influenced patients’ recovery.
[Digitized materials]

Asylum for the Relief of Persons Deprived of the Use of Their Reason. Annual report. 1819.
[Digitized version]

Kirkbride, Thomas Story. On the construction, organization, and general arrangements of hospitals for the insane.  Philadelphia : Lindsay & Blakiston, 1854
[Digitized version via Hathi Trust]

Guiding Questions

  • Who created these items? For what purpose?
  • How does these items contribute to your understanding of this subject?
  • In what ways do these items contribute or not contribute to destigmatizing mental health treatment?
  • What do you find interesting about these items?What additional contextual information would you need to understand these documents? Where might you might find this information, and why might you choose a particular source over another?